Copyright 2018 - Gesellschaft für Fantastikforschung

Deadline: March 30, 2019

 

Special Issue of Mythlore, Fall 2019 Guest Edited by Donna R. White **

Draft Deadline: March 30, 2019 ** Final paper deadline: June 30, 2019 **

Mythlore, a journal dedicated to the genres of myth and fantasy (particularly the works of  J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis), invites article submissions for a special issue focused on children’s literature. Children’s fantasy has always been a part of mythopoeic literature, and Mythlore has occasionally published articles about myth-building children’s writers such as J.K. Rowling and Nancy Farmer; however, this special issue will focus specifically on mythopoeic literature for children. As always, we welcome essays on The Chronicles of Narnia and The Hobbit, but we also encourage articles that discuss the works of other mythopoeic writers for young readers. Classic works like Peter Pan and The Wind in the Willows have clear mythopoeic elements, as do modern fantasies by Philip Pullman, Diana Wynne Jones, Lloyd Alexander, and many others. Studies of lesser known writers like Carol Kendall are also welcome.

Weiterlesen: Mythopoeic Children’s Literature

 

Deadline: October 31, 2018

 

 

 

Date and Time: Tuesday, November 27, 2018. 9:00am-5:00pm

 

Location: New York City College of Technology, 300 Jay St., Namm N119, Brooklyn, NY

 

 

 

“So much has been done, exclaimed the soul of Frankenstein—more, far more, will I achieve; treading in the steps already marked, I will pioneer a new way, explore unknown powers, and unfold to the world the deepest mysteries of creation.”

 

–Mary Shelley, Frankenstein (1831 edition)

 

“Yeah, but your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could that they didn’t stop to think if they should.”

 

–Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum), Jurassic Park (1993)

 

Ian Malcolm’s admonition above is as much a rebuke to the lasting echo of Victor Frankenstein’s ambition to accomplish “more, far more” as it is to park owner John Hammond’s explaining, “Our scientists have done things no one could ever do before.” Films like Jurassic Park and the kind of literature that came to be known as Science Fiction (SF) owe a tremendous debt to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus (1818). In addition to being an (if not the) inaugural work of SF, Mary Shelley builds her cautionary tale around interdisciplinary approaches to science, and she takes this innovation further by applying the humanities to question the nature of being in the world, the effects of science on society, and the ethical responsibilities of scientists. These are only some of Frankenstein’s groundbreaking insights, which as Brian Aldiss and David Wingrove observe in Trillion Year Spree (1986), “is marvellously good and inexhaustible in its interest” (20). The many dimensions of interdisciplinarity in Frankenstein and the SF that followed are the focus of the Third Annual City Tech Science Fiction Symposium.

Weiterlesen: 200 Years of Interdisciplinarity Beginning with Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein: The Third Annual City...

Deadline: December 17, 2018

 

Co-edited by Sean Guynes-Vishniac and Derek R. Sweet

Star Wars. The name evokes billion-dollar blockbusters, a film franchise that has last more than forty years. For most people, Star Wars is the Star Wars films—that one with the teddy bears, the ones with Darth Vader and the lasers swords, with Yoda. But Star Wars fans and Lucasfilm payroll know better and for forty years have developed Star Wars as a media brand and transmedia franchise, branching the galaxy far, far away out across every media thinkable and expanding its storyworld to thousands of intellectual properties manifest in dozens of video and analog games, thousands of comics, hundreds of novels, uncountable toys, and, of course, multiple television shows.

Weiterlesen: STAR WARS TV. Transmedia Worlds, Franchise Politics, and Televisual Culture

Deadline: October 31, 2018

 

In advance of The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim’s tenth anniversary in 2021, this collection of essays seeks to investigate how the game hails its player as “dragonborn,” a calling that merges political, social, and religious narratives in the game toward the player’s assumption of the dragonborn identity position: savior of Skyrim. Our collection aims to identify and explore these hailed positions within the cultural ecology of the game, which is always connected to the player’s out-of-game realities. Situated on the threshold of intricately detailed “cultural” cities and the expansive “natural” wilderness, the dragonborn negotiates the complex political workings of life under the civil war between the rebel Stormcloaks and the Imperial Legion.

Weiterlesen: Being Dragonborn: Critical Essays on The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim

Deadline: 15th of November 2018

 

“But now, we must eat!”

Food and Drink in Science Fiction

 

In her contribution to Reel Food: Essays on Food and Film (2004), Laurel Forster remarks that “food appears as an important element in a surprising number of […] science fiction films” and helps “illuminat[e] social, national, and even global structures, agencies, and order.” Thus, the interrelationships between food and science fiction offer “a valuable means of understanding the link between the individual and controlling powers around her/him.” While many science fiction texts employ food and drink in uncritical ways and/or as “simple” (if such exists) props supporting the narrative action, the genre also often foregrounds food and drink (and the attendant activities of eating and drinking) as means for generating affect and/or producing meaning. For example, in David Cronenberg’s The Fly (1986), half‐mutated Seth vomits digestive juices onto his morning donut to prepare it for consumption, noting, “Oh, that is disgusting,” thereby mirroring the viewer’s response to the on‐screen action. Similarly, when first the aliens and then “undercover” Frank consume the green, vomit‐like goo in Peter Jackson’s Bad Taste (1987), this moment might evoke laughter or, more likely, induce anastaltic reflexes. Likewise, disgust and revulsion were likely the first reactions Star Trek: Discovery (2017–) viewers had to Terran Empress Georgiou dining on the ganglia of a Kelpian—a sentient species kept as slaves and livestock. What do these corporeal responses to food images mean? What meanings do food and drink, more generally, communicate in science fiction texts?

Weiterlesen: Food and Drink in Science Fiction, Edited Volume

Deadline: Oct. 22, 2018

 

Crafting the Long Tomorrow is a three-day, small-scale conference at the University of Arizona’s Biosphere 2 near Tucson, Arizona. Biosphere 2 has emerged as a leading site for arts, sciences and humanities dialogues. This meeting, which coincides with the 101st anniversary of the death of the world’s last Carolina Parakeet, will encourage innovative and inventive presentations and conversation, with an eye toward public-facing engagement outcomes. It will take place Feb. 21-24, 2019, and is currently sponsored by the University of Arizona (Office of Research, Discovery and Innovation; College of Social and Behavioral Sciences; College of Science) and the Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society/Ludwig Maximillian University and the Deutsches Museum, Munich, which provided initial seed money. Additional sponsors are, we hope, forthcoming.

Weiterlesen: Crafting the Long Tomorrow: New Conversations & Productive Catalysts Across Science and Humanities...

Deadline: 1 December 2018

 

Special Issue of Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies

Guest editors:

Christian Pentzold (University of Bremen, Germany), Anne Kaun (Södertörn University, Sweden), and Christine Lohmeier (University of Bremen, Germany)

Digital media, networked services, and aggregate data are beacons of the future. These incessantly emerging tools and infrastructures project new ways of communication, bring unknown kinds of information, and open up untrodden paths of interaction. Yet digital technologies do not only forecast uncharted times or predict what comes next. They are, it seems, both prognostic and progressive media: they don’t await the times to come but realize the utopian as well as dystopian visions which they have always already foreseen. At the same time, all calculation of anticipations has to rely on past data that profoundly shape our ability to manage expectations and minimize uncertainties.

Weiterlesen: Back to the Future: Telling and Taming Anticipatory Media Visions and Technologies

Deadline: June 1, 2019

 

Robin Reid, Christopher Vaccaro, and Stephen Yandell, eds.

The editors invite submissions of essays by June 1, 2019 on a wide range of topics related to queerness in Tolkien/Middle-earth Studies.

Topics include but are not limited to: Otherness, the uncanny, the marginalized and oppressed, liminality, the stranger/outsider, monstrous neighbor, genderqueer, homo-eroticism, homo-amory, homosocial continuum, female queerness, female masculinity, queer fandom, queer publics/counter publics, transgender queerness, queer gaze, queer fandoms, film theory, medievalisms, applying theories by Ahmed, Butler, Doty, Halberstam, Lévinas, Pugh, Zizek, etc.

Weiterlesen: Queer Tolkien

Deadliene: October 31, 2018

 

Please join us for ICFA 40, March 13-17, 2019, when our theme will be “Politics and Conflicts.”

 

We welcome papers on the work of: Guest Scholar Mark Bould (Reader, University of the West of England; winner of the SFRA Pilgrim Award; author of several books on sf including Science Fiction: The Routledge Film Guidebook) and Guest Author G. Willow Wilson (winner of a PEN Center award; writer of the Hugo-Award-winning series Ms. Marvel, author of Alif the Unseen).

Weiterlesen: “Politics and Conflicts,” the 40th International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts