Copyright 2019 - Gesellschaft für Fantastikforschung

 

MORE MEALS TO COME

An International Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

To celebrate the 300th anniversary of the publication of Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, the 70th anniversary of Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four and the 50th anniversary of Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness, the ALIMENTOPIA Team invites fellow researchers to participate in More Meals to Come, an International Conference on Utopian/Dystopian Foodways. We are especially interested in multidisciplinary approaches bridging utopian studies and food studies within fields such as Literature, Linguistics, Culture, History, Nutrition, Psychology, Anthropology, and the Arts.

Weiterlesen: MORE MEALS TO COME

Deadline: June 1, 2019

 

The academic journal Messages, Sages and Ages (http://www.msa.usv.ro/), based at the English Department, University of Suceava, Romania, invites contributions for an issue on “science fiction as reality-check”; the theme issue is guest edited by Roberto Paura (University of Perugia, Italy).

As speculative fiction, science fiction (SF) in literature and film has proved able to lay bare the contradictions of modernity’s techno-utopian projects far ahead of its time, prompting readers to reflect on the relationship between humankind and technological civilization. Over seventy years ago, in his robot stories Isaac Asimov anticipated today’s debate on the relationship between automation and technological unemployment. In the Cold War years, post-apocalyptic fiction played a decisive role in making exceedingly clear the dangers of nuclear war as well as in stimulating reflection on its likely long-term consequences. In the 1960s and 70s, the emphasis on the issues of overpopulation and the ecological bomb influenced the rise of the ecological movement. In the 80s, the cyberpunk scene foreshadowed the pervasive social impact of cyberspace on our lives, examining the emergence of large corporations based on the power of big data. Today, at the core of SF lie 1) climate change (i.e. ‘climate fiction’ – Kim Stanley Robinson), 2) the boundary between reality and simulation (i.e. Matrix and Westworld), 3) the pitfalls of the digital age (i.e. The Circle, Black Mirror), 4) the trade-off between opportunity and risk in the context of genetic engineering (i.e. Jeff VanderMeer, Annalee Newtiz or Paolo Bacigalupi) and 5) the rise of post-human species (i.e. Charles Stross, Greg Egan or Altered Carbon).

Weiterlesen: Reading Reality through Science Fiction

Deadline: June 1, 2019

 

Robin Reid, Christopher Vaccaro, and Stephen Yandell, eds.

The editors invite submissions of essays by June 1, 2019 on a wide range of topics related to queerness in Tolkien/Middle-earth Studies.

Topics include but are not limited to: Otherness, the uncanny, the marginalized and oppressed, liminality, the stranger/outsider, monstrous neighbor, genderqueer, homo-eroticism, homo-amory, homosocial continuum, female queerness, female masculinity, queer fandom, queer publics/counter publics, transgender queerness, queer gaze, queer fandoms, film theory, medievalisms, applying theories by Ahmed, Butler, Doty, Halberstam, Lévinas, Pugh, Zizek, etc.

Weiterlesen: Queer Tolkien

The OGOM Project is known for its imaginative events and symposia, which have often been accompanied by a media frenzy. We were the first to invite vampires into the academy back in 2010. Our most recent endeavour, Company of Wolves: Werewolves, Shapeshifters and Feral Humans enjoyed extensive coverage globally and saw us congratulated in the THES for our ambitious 3 day programme which included actual wolves, ‘a first for a UK academy’. Our fourth conference will be an exciting collaboration with the Supernatural Cities: Narrated Geographies and Spectral Histories project at the University of Portsmouth. Supernatural Cities will enjoy its third regeneration, having previously convened in Portsmouth and Limerick.

Weiterlesen: OGOM & Supernatural Cities present: The Urban Weird

CfP: Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction

 

The Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction is a peer-reviewed, open-access, online journal hosted by the University of California at Riverside, affiliated with the UCR Library’s Eaton Collection of Science Fiction & Fantasy. Graduate student editors run the Eaton Journal, with scholarly review provided by an interdisciplinary executive board made up of SF scholars, research librarians, and archivists.

Weiterlesen: CfP: Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction

Deadline: May 1, 2017

full name / name of organization:
Anne DeLong/Transylvanian Society of Dracula

Weiterlesen: CfP: Journal of Dracula Studies

Deadline: April 30th 2017

Most handbooks on the subject of horror focus specifically on film, whereas books on the literary manifestations of horror tend to be bound to the idea of the “Gothic.” The current field of Gothic studies grows out of the study of Romanticism, and refers specifically to a late eighteenth-century genre, but has also come to denote a critical approach to literature, film, and culture, drawing on psychoanalysis, post structural criticism, feminist and queer theory. These perspectives are all to be included here, but the book responds to a growing sense that “horror” is itself a worthwhile focus of analysis. This handbook will focus very strongly on literature, giving it specific value on established English literature University courses worldwide, and allowing for an exploration of horror that looks further back than the Gothic. It also takes an international approach. Each chapter will achieve a balance between a useful overview or context of the selected topic as well as posing an original argument.

Weiterlesen: CfP: The Handbook to Horror Literature – select chapters needed!

Deadline: Open Call.

Series Editor: Professor Sonja Fritzsche, Michigan State University

http://www.peterlang.com?WSFS

The book series World Science Fiction Studies understands science fiction to be a global phenomenon and explores the various manifestations of the genre in cultures around the world. It recognizes the importance of Anglo-American contributions to the field but promotes the critical study of science fiction in other national traditions, particularly German-speaking. It also supports the investigation of transnational discourses that have shaped the science fiction tradition since its inception. The scope of the series is not limited to one particular medium and encourages study of the genre in both print and digital forms (e.g. literature, film, television, transmedial). Theoretical approaches (e.g. post-human, gender, genre theory) and genre studies (e.g. film shorts, transgenre such as science fiction comedy) with a focus beyond the Anglo-American tradition are also welcome.

Proposals for monographs and edited collections in either English or German are invited. For more information, please contact Dr Laurel Plapp, Senior Commissioning Editor, Peter Lang Ltd, 52 St Giles, Oxford OX1 3LU, UK. Email: . Tel: +44 (0) 1865 514160.

Deadline: Open Call.

Science Fiction Film and Television continues to invite submissions for upcoming issues. Preferred length for articles is approximately 7000–9000 words; all topics related to science fiction film, television, and related media will be considered. Typical response time is within three months. Check the journal website at Liverpool University Press for full guidelines for contributors (http://online.liverpooluniversitypress.co.uk/loi/sfftv); please direct any individualized queries to .