Copyright 2020 - Gesellschaft für Fantastikforschung

On the one hand, within literary and film studies, the notion of horror is used as a genological category. On the other hand, as an aesthetic category, it is referred to various cultural texts: literary works, films, and TV series as well as theatrical performances and video games. Anita Has-Tokarz, in a monograph Horror w literaturze współczesnej i filmie [Horror in Contemporary Literature and Film] (2010), even considers it to denote “an effect [of dread] exerted on the recipient by a [cultural] text” (p. 51; our own translation). We would like to devote the third issue of “Dzieciństwo. Literatura i Kultura” to the relations of childhood and adolescence with horror – understood in all these ways – which are visible in three fields of consideration.

Please find pasted below the call for papers for the next issue of Dzieciństwo. Literatura i Kultura [Childhood: Literature and Culture], a biannual journal published at the University of Warsaw, Poland. The theme of the issue is Horror(s) of childhood and adolescence, and the deadline is January, 31, 2020.

The first issue of the journal is here: https://www.journals.polon.uw.edu.pl/index.php/dlk/issue/view/18.
All papers are peer-reviewed and, if accepted, published in open access without any article processing fees.

Deadline: 31. Januar 2020

 

CfP for a Special Issue of Science Fiction Film & Television

 

Guest editors: Cameron Kunzelman and Darshana Jayemanne

an interdisciplinary journal dedicated to challenging gender in science fiction, fantasy, magical realism, surrealism, myth, folklore, and other supernatural genres

Dear friends and colleagues,

A friend and I are putting together a panel on African-American alternate history for a conference at University College Dublin in December 2019, and we are looking for a third speaker to join us.

The title of the conference is:  Alternative Realities: New Challenges for American Literature in the Era of Trump

If you or yours works on some form, version, reflection on, and /or example of alternate histories within, about, or in response to contemporary African-American literature OR if you'd like more details about the conference or about the panel, please contact me: Keren Omry This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  or Sonia Weiner This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

MORE MEALS TO COME

An International Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

To celebrate the 300th anniversary of the publication of Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, the 70th anniversary of Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four and the 50th anniversary of Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness, the ALIMENTOPIA Team invites fellow researchers to participate in More Meals to Come, an International Conference on Utopian/Dystopian Foodways. We are especially interested in multidisciplinary approaches bridging utopian studies and food studies within fields such as Literature, Linguistics, Culture, History, Nutrition, Psychology, Anthropology, and the Arts.

CfP: Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction

 

The Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction is a peer-reviewed, open-access, online journal hosted by the University of California at Riverside, affiliated with the UCR Library’s Eaton Collection of Science Fiction & Fantasy. Graduate student editors run the Eaton Journal, with scholarly review provided by an interdisciplinary executive board made up of SF scholars, research librarians, and archivists.

Deadline: May 1, 2017

full name / name of organization:
Anne DeLong/Transylvanian Society of Dracula

Deadline: April 30th 2017

Most handbooks on the subject of horror focus specifically on film, whereas books on the literary manifestations of horror tend to be bound to the idea of the “Gothic.” The current field of Gothic studies grows out of the study of Romanticism, and refers specifically to a late eighteenth-century genre, but has also come to denote a critical approach to literature, film, and culture, drawing on psychoanalysis, post structural criticism, feminist and queer theory. These perspectives are all to be included here, but the book responds to a growing sense that “horror” is itself a worthwhile focus of analysis. This handbook will focus very strongly on literature, giving it specific value on established English literature University courses worldwide, and allowing for an exploration of horror that looks further back than the Gothic. It also takes an international approach. Each chapter will achieve a balance between a useful overview or context of the selected topic as well as posing an original argument.