Copyright 2018 - Gesellschaft für Fantastikforschung

Deadline: March 30, 2019

 

Special Issue of Mythlore, Fall 2019 Guest Edited by Donna R. White **

Draft Deadline: March 30, 2019 ** Final paper deadline: June 30, 2019 **

Mythlore, a journal dedicated to the genres of myth and fantasy (particularly the works of  J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis), invites article submissions for a special issue focused on children’s literature. Children’s fantasy has always been a part of mythopoeic literature, and Mythlore has occasionally published articles about myth-building children’s writers such as J.K. Rowling and Nancy Farmer; however, this special issue will focus specifically on mythopoeic literature for children. As always, we welcome essays on The Chronicles of Narnia and The Hobbit, but we also encourage articles that discuss the works of other mythopoeic writers for young readers. Classic works like Peter Pan and The Wind in the Willows have clear mythopoeic elements, as do modern fantasies by Philip Pullman, Diana Wynne Jones, Lloyd Alexander, and many others. Studies of lesser known writers like Carol Kendall are also welcome.

Read more: Mythopoeic Children’s Literature

Deadline: December 17, 2018

 

Co-edited by Sean Guynes-Vishniac and Derek R. Sweet

Star Wars. The name evokes billion-dollar blockbusters, a film franchise that has last more than forty years. For most people, Star Wars is the Star Wars films—that one with the teddy bears, the ones with Darth Vader and the lasers swords, with Yoda. But Star Wars fans and Lucasfilm payroll know better and for forty years have developed Star Wars as a media brand and transmedia franchise, branching the galaxy far, far away out across every media thinkable and expanding its storyworld to thousands of intellectual properties manifest in dozens of video and analog games, thousands of comics, hundreds of novels, uncountable toys, and, of course, multiple television shows.

Read more: STAR WARS TV. Transmedia Worlds, Franchise Politics, and Televisual Culture

Deadline: 15th of November 2018

 

“But now, we must eat!”

Food and Drink in Science Fiction

 

In her contribution to Reel Food: Essays on Food and Film (2004), Laurel Forster remarks that “food appears as an important element in a surprising number of […] science fiction films” and helps “illuminat[e] social, national, and even global structures, agencies, and order.” Thus, the interrelationships between food and science fiction offer “a valuable means of understanding the link between the individual and controlling powers around her/him.” While many science fiction texts employ food and drink in uncritical ways and/or as “simple” (if such exists) props supporting the narrative action, the genre also often foregrounds food and drink (and the attendant activities of eating and drinking) as means for generating affect and/or producing meaning. For example, in David Cronenberg’s The Fly (1986), half‐mutated Seth vomits digestive juices onto his morning donut to prepare it for consumption, noting, “Oh, that is disgusting,” thereby mirroring the viewer’s response to the on‐screen action. Similarly, when first the aliens and then “undercover” Frank consume the green, vomit‐like goo in Peter Jackson’s Bad Taste (1987), this moment might evoke laughter or, more likely, induce anastaltic reflexes. Likewise, disgust and revulsion were likely the first reactions Star Trek: Discovery (2017–) viewers had to Terran Empress Georgiou dining on the ganglia of a Kelpian—a sentient species kept as slaves and livestock. What do these corporeal responses to food images mean? What meanings do food and drink, more generally, communicate in science fiction texts?

Read more: Food and Drink in Science Fiction, Edited Volume

Deadline: 1 December 2018

 

Special Issue of Convergence: The International Journal of Research into New Media Technologies

Guest editors:

Christian Pentzold (University of Bremen, Germany), Anne Kaun (Södertörn University, Sweden), and Christine Lohmeier (University of Bremen, Germany)

Digital media, networked services, and aggregate data are beacons of the future. These incessantly emerging tools and infrastructures project new ways of communication, bring unknown kinds of information, and open up untrodden paths of interaction. Yet digital technologies do not only forecast uncharted times or predict what comes next. They are, it seems, both prognostic and progressive media: they don’t await the times to come but realize the utopian as well as dystopian visions which they have always already foreseen. At the same time, all calculation of anticipations has to rely on past data that profoundly shape our ability to manage expectations and minimize uncertainties.

Read more: Back to the Future: Telling and Taming Anticipatory Media Visions and Technologies

Deadline: June 1, 2019

 

Robin Reid, Christopher Vaccaro, and Stephen Yandell, eds.

The editors invite submissions of essays by June 1, 2019 on a wide range of topics related to queerness in Tolkien/Middle-earth Studies.

Topics include but are not limited to: Otherness, the uncanny, the marginalized and oppressed, liminality, the stranger/outsider, monstrous neighbor, genderqueer, homo-eroticism, homo-amory, homosocial continuum, female queerness, female masculinity, queer fandom, queer publics/counter publics, transgender queerness, queer gaze, queer fandoms, film theory, medievalisms, applying theories by Ahmed, Butler, Doty, Halberstam, Lévinas, Pugh, Zizek, etc.

Read more: Queer Tolkien

Deadline: 30th of November 2018

 

We are very proud to announce our third Call For Papers. The theme of the 2018 collection is: "The Evolution of Evil in Fantasy and Science Fiction".

Our first call for papers, "Gender and Sexuality in Fantasy and Science Fiction" received 2 BSFA Awards nomination and one BSFA Awards shortlist. The second call for papers, "The Evolution of African Fantasy and Science Fiction", will be out this summer.

It is time for a new challenge!

Writers are invited to explore the concept of evil in all its shapes and developments, in literature, games, movies and TV.

Read more: The Evolution of Evil in Fantasy and Science Fiction

The OGOM Project is known for its imaginative events and symposia, which have often been accompanied by a media frenzy. We were the first to invite vampires into the academy back in 2010. Our most recent endeavour, Company of Wolves: Werewolves, Shapeshifters and Feral Humans enjoyed extensive coverage globally and saw us congratulated in the THES for our ambitious 3 day programme which included actual wolves, ‘a first for a UK academy’. Our fourth conference will be an exciting collaboration with the Supernatural Cities: Narrated Geographies and Spectral Histories project at the University of Portsmouth. Supernatural Cities will enjoy its third regeneration, having previously convened in Portsmouth and Limerick.

Read more: OGOM & Supernatural Cities present: The Urban Weird

CfP: Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction

 

The Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction is a peer-reviewed, open-access, online journal hosted by the University of California at Riverside, affiliated with the UCR Library’s Eaton Collection of Science Fiction & Fantasy. Graduate student editors run the Eaton Journal, with scholarly review provided by an interdisciplinary executive board made up of SF scholars, research librarians, and archivists.

Read more: CfP: Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction

Deadline: May 1, 2017

full name / name of organization:
Anne DeLong/Transylvanian Society of Dracula

Read more: CfP: Journal of Dracula Studies