Copyright 2019 - Gesellschaft für Fantastikforschung

Deadline:  1 March 2019

 

SCIENCE FICTION RESEARCH ASSOCIATION ANNUAL CONFERENCE 2019: Facing the Future, Facing the Past: Colonialism, Inidigeneity, and SF. Friday, June 21 - Monday, June 24, 2019. Chaminade University, Honolulu, Hawaii

 

Keynote Speaker: Nalo Hopkinson,

The Science Fiction Research Association invites proposals for its 2019 annual conference, to be held on the campus of Chaminade University, Honolulu, Hawaii.

“I ka wā mua, ka wā ma hope” is a Hawaiian proverb that can be translated, “In the past lies the future,” or more literally, “In what is in front of you is found what is behind you.” In the Native Hawaiian way of thinking, according to scholar Lilikalā Kame‘eleihiwa, “The Hawaiian stands firmly in the present, with his back to the future, and his eyes fixed upon the past, seeking historical answers for present-day dilemmas.” Another way of interpreting this saying might be, you must face the past to prepare yourself for the future. Thinking about this Hawaiian proverb in the context of science fiction brings up questions about ways of knowing, ways of orienting ourselves in time and space, the relation of our notions of the possible to our understanding of history, the ethical and political obligations of our scientific-technological practice in relation to the past and the future, and our expectations of social change as well as our sense of how it comes about.

Read more: Facing the Future, Facing the Past: Colonialism, Inidigeneity, and SF

Deadline: February 1, 2019

 

The 2019 Academic Conference on Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy will be held Friday and Saturday, June 7-8, 2019, in Toronto, Ontario, at the Merril Collection of Science Fiction, Speculation and Fantasy, one of the most important collections of fantastic literature in the world. 

Read more: Academic Conference on Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy

Deadline: January 31th, 2019

 

Despite the incidence of climate change scepticism amongst right-wing politicians in the United States and elsewhere, there is a near-consensus amongst scientists that current levels of atmospheric greenhouse gas are sufficient to alter global weather patterns to possibly disastrous effect. Writing in the journal Utopian Studies in 2016, the Californian science fiction writer Kim Stanley Robinson observed that: ‘Climate change is inevitable - we’re already in it - and because we’re caught in technological and cultural path dependency, we can’t easily get back out of it ... It has become a case of utopia or catastrophe, and utopia has gone from being a somewhat minor literary problem to a necessary survival strategy.’ The 20th conference of the European Utopian Studies Society will be held at Monash University’s Prato Centre in Tuscany from 1-5 July 2019. The conference theme will be Utopia, Dystopia and Climate Change and it will address the way utopianists have explored the eutopian and dystopian possible outcomes of anthropogenic global warming. As with all the Society’s conferences, papers on other aspects of utopias and utopianism will also be welcome. The guest of honour and keynote speaker will be Professor Darko Suvin, author of Metamorphoses of Science Fiction. We welcome proposals for individual 20-minute papers, panel sessions where 3 or 4 speakers address a shared topic, and workshops where contributors address questions of practical activism. Conference website: https://sites.google.com/monash.edu/uss2019.

Read more: Conference of the Utopian Studies Society: Utopia, Dystopia and Climate Change

Deadline: February 1, 2019

 

The 2019 Academic Conference on Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy will be held Friday and Saturday, June 7-8, 2019, in Toronto, Ontario, at the Merril Collection of Science Fiction, Speculation and Fantasy, one of the most important collections of fantastic literature in the world.

Read more: The 2019 Academic Conference on Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy

 

MORE MEALS TO COME

An International Conference

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

To celebrate the 300th anniversary of the publication of Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, the 70th anniversary of Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four and the 50th anniversary of Le Guin’s The Left Hand of Darkness, the ALIMENTOPIA Team invites fellow researchers to participate in More Meals to Come, an International Conference on Utopian/Dystopian Foodways. We are especially interested in multidisciplinary approaches bridging utopian studies and food studies within fields such as Literature, Linguistics, Culture, History, Nutrition, Psychology, Anthropology, and the Arts.

Read more: MORE MEALS TO COME

Deadline: 15 March 2019

 

History Faculty, University of Oxford, 5-6 July 2019

Following the success of the July 2018 colloquium, we are announcing a conference “Fan Cultures and the Premodern World” to be held at Oxford on 5 and 6 July 2019. We welcome proposals on various aspects of premodern (ancient, medieval, early modern) culture which can be better understood through the lens of the modern phenomena of fanfic, cosplay, celebrity studies, LARP, gaming etc.

Read more: Fan Cultures and the Premodern World

Deadline: June 1, 2019

 

The academic journal Messages, Sages and Ages (http://www.msa.usv.ro/), based at the English Department, University of Suceava, Romania, invites contributions for an issue on “science fiction as reality-check”; the theme issue is guest edited by Roberto Paura (University of Perugia, Italy).

As speculative fiction, science fiction (SF) in literature and film has proved able to lay bare the contradictions of modernity’s techno-utopian projects far ahead of its time, prompting readers to reflect on the relationship between humankind and technological civilization. Over seventy years ago, in his robot stories Isaac Asimov anticipated today’s debate on the relationship between automation and technological unemployment. In the Cold War years, post-apocalyptic fiction played a decisive role in making exceedingly clear the dangers of nuclear war as well as in stimulating reflection on its likely long-term consequences. In the 1960s and 70s, the emphasis on the issues of overpopulation and the ecological bomb influenced the rise of the ecological movement. In the 80s, the cyberpunk scene foreshadowed the pervasive social impact of cyberspace on our lives, examining the emergence of large corporations based on the power of big data. Today, at the core of SF lie 1) climate change (i.e. ‘climate fiction’ – Kim Stanley Robinson), 2) the boundary between reality and simulation (i.e. Matrix and Westworld), 3) the pitfalls of the digital age (i.e. The Circle, Black Mirror), 4) the trade-off between opportunity and risk in the context of genetic engineering (i.e. Jeff VanderMeer, Annalee Newtiz or Paolo Bacigalupi) and 5) the rise of post-human species (i.e. Charles Stross, Greg Egan or Altered Carbon).

Read more: Reading Reality through Science Fiction

Deadline: 21 March 2019

 

 

The Sussex Centre for Folklore, Fairy Tales and Fantasy seeks articles and book reviews relating to creative, literary and historical approaches to folklore, fairy tales, fantasy, gothic, science fiction and magic realism for publication in Gramarye, its peer-reviewed journal published by the University of Chichester.

Read more: Articles and reviews on folklore, fairy tales and the fantastic

Deadline: April 1, 2019

 

Folk Horror in the 21st Century, is a two-day conference to be hosted by Falmouth University (UK) on Thursday September 5 and Friday September 6, 2019. The conference organizers Ruth Heholt (Falmouth University, UK) and Dawn Keetley (Lehigh University, USA) invite proposals on all aspects of folk horror, in all periods, across all regions and in all mediums, exploring the meanings and manifestations of the folk horror renaissance in the 21st century.

Keynote and plenary speakers: Tanya Krzywinska (Falmouth University), Catherine Spooner (Lancaster University) and Bernice Murphy (Trinity College Dublin).

Read more: Folk Horror in the 21st Century