Copyright 2017 - Gesellschaft für Fantastikforschung

CfP: Gothic Animals: Uncanny Otherness and the Animal With-Out (edited collection)

deadline: November 1, 2017

 ‘The boundary between the animal and the human has long been unstable, especially since the Victorian period. Where the boundary is drawn between human and animal is itself an expression of political power and dominance, and the ‘animal’ can at once express the deepest fears and greatest aspirations of a society’ (Victorian Animal Dreams, 4).

‘The animal, like the ghost or good or evil spirit with which it is often associated, has been a manifestation of the uncanny’ (Timothy Clark, 185).

In the mid nineteenth-century Charles Darwin published his theories of evolution. And as Deborah Denenholz Morse and Martin A. Danahay suggest, ‘The effect of Darwin’s ideas was both to make the human more animal and the animal more human, destabilizing boundaries in both directions’ (Victorian Animal Dreams, 2). Nineteenth-century fiction quickly picked up on the idea of the ‘animal within’ with texts like R.L. Stevenson’s Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray and H. G. Wells’s The Island of Doctor Moreau. In these novels the fear explored was of an unruly, defiant, degenerate and entirely amoral animality lying (mostly) dormant within all of us. This was our animal-other associated with the id: passions, appetites and capable of a complete disregard for all taboos and any restraint. As Cyndy Hendershot states, this ‘animal within’ ‘threatened to usurp masculine rationality and return man to a state of irrational chaos’ (The Animal Within, 97). This however, relates the animal to the human in a very specific, anthropocentric way. Non-humans and humans have other sorts of encounters too, and even before Darwin humans have often had an uneasy relationship with animals. Rats, horses, dogs, cats, birds and other beasts have, as Donna Haraway puts it a way of ‘looking back’ at us (When Species Meet,19).

Read more: CfP: Gothic Animals: Uncanny Otherness and the Animal With-Out (edited collection)

ExRe(y) 2018. Exhaustion and Regeneration in Post-Millennial North-American Literature and Visual Culture

Deadline: 15 November 2017

Department of American Literature and Culture, in cooperation with the Video Game Research Center, is organizing a two-day international conference “ExRe(y) 2018. Exhaustion and Regeneration in Post-Millennial North-American Literature and Visual Culture.” We seek proposals for papers and panels that focus on the topic of exhaustion and regeneration in American and Canadian literature and visual culture (film, visual arts, video games, television, and others) of the last seventeen years, from the year 2000 to the present day.

Read more: ExRe(y) 2018. Exhaustion and Regeneration in Post-Millennial North-American Literature and Visual...

CfP: Investigating Identities in Young Adult (YA) Narratives: Symposium on the 13/12/2017 at The University of Northampton UK

deadline: October 8, 2017

 

From JK Rowling’s Harry Potter series to Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight, Young Adult (YA) narratives have grown exponentially over the past twenty years. Adopting a range of genres and platforms including the Bildungsroman and the coming of age teen drama, YA narratives represent a significant cultural means to explore the formation of identity in all its varied aspects. This one day symposium at the University of Northampton will investigate the representation of identity constructions in relation to narrative form in YA narratives both past and present.

Read more: CfP: Investigating Identities in Young Adult (YA) Narratives: Symposium on the 13/12/2017 at The...

CfP: Folklore and Popular Culture, Popular Culture Association, Indianapolis, IN

deadline: October 1, 2017

POPULAR CULTURE ASSOCIATION & AMERICAN CULTURE ASSOCIATION 2018 JOINT NATIONAL CONFERENCE

Indianapolis, IN
March 28-March 31, 2018

For information on the PCA/ACA, please go to http://www.pcaaca.org
For conference information, please go to
http://www.pcaaca.org/national-conference/

We are considering proposals for sessions organized around a theme, special panels, and/or individual papers concerning folklore and popular culture.

Read more: CfP: Folklore and Popular Culture, Popular Culture Association, Indianapolis, IN

CfP: Beyond Afrofuturism

deadline: January 31, 2018

Extrapolation guest editors Lisa Yaszek and Isiah Lavender III seek original essays by scholars and artists who are interested in the question of what might co-exist with—or lie beyond—Afrofuturism. Ever since Mark Dery introduced the term in 1993, “Afrofuturism” has been one of the primary ways artists, scholars, and fans alike have discussed contemporary speculative fiction by people of the African diaspora. But as students of genre history know well, every two to three decades there is a sea change as the science fiction community redefines the thematic and stylistic concerns of “good” science fiction, and, in doing so, paves the way for new modes of speculative storytelling. As the term “Afrofuturism” nears its quarter-century of use, it is natural to ask: is Afrofuturism a “colored wave” within science fiction history, much like the New Wave or cyberpunk, or might its multigenre status provide some kind of energy that transcends (and transforms) science fiction history as we know it? What is Afrofuturism today, and is it the only—or the best—way to describe black speculative cultural practices across the globe? What might co-exist with—or lie beyond—Afrofuturism?

Read more: CfP: Beyond Afrofuturism

CfP: The New Urban Gothic Edited Collection Call for Chapters

 deadline: 30 August, 2017

Urban Gothic is a subgenre of Gothic fiction, Gothic crime fiction, and television whose narratives spring from discourse on industrial and post-industrial urban society. Often dystopic, it was pioneered in the mid-19th century in Britain and the United States and developed in serialisations such as R. L. Stevenson’s The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886); into novels such as Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890). Much has been written on 19th century Anglo-centred Urban Gothic fiction and vampiristic, monstrous Urban Gothic, but less has been written on the 21st century reimagining and re-serialisation of the Urban Gothic in mechanised, altered, disabled, and dystopic states of being. Nor has writing on the Urban Gothic departed from the canonical London location or considered the Urban Gothic as the prime progenitor of the genre of Crime Fiction. The intention, therefore, is for The New Urban Gothic to explore the resurgence in serialised and grotesque narratives of degeneration, ecological and economic ruin, dystopia, mechanised future inequality, and crime narrative as evidenced in literature and new forms of media in an international context. Submissions are welcomed that address the historic specificities of urban difference and Gothic traditions, as well as inter-disciplinary studies and contemporary texts that link urban crime fiction and the Gothic.

Read more: CfP: The New Urban Gothic Edited Collection Call for Chapters

CfP: Disasters, Apocalypses, and Catastrophes: PCA/ACA 2018 3/28-3/31 Indianapolis

deadline: October 1, 2017

 

PCA/ACA 2018 Indianapolis, IN

Disasters, Apocalypses, and Catastrophes (Ficociello and Bell)

The PCA/ACA annual conference is March 28 through March 31 in Indianapolis, Indiana

In a hyper-mediated global culture, disaster events reach us with great speed and digital detail, and we begin forming, interpreting, and historicizing catastrophes simultaneously with people worldwide. Are we inside the era of disasters or are we merely inundated by mediated accounts of events categorized as catastrophic? How do these mediated accounts affect policy, poverty, and the public? Of particular interest is the question of what role do academics play in disaster culture and policy?

Disasters, Apocalypses, and Catastrophes offers a forum for these questions and critical approaches surrounding the culture of disasters, catastrophes, accidents, and apocalypses in global art, literature, media, film, and popular culture. Disasters, Apocalypses, and Catastrophes will address broader disciplinary topics and innovative intersections of humanities, musicology, social science, literature, film, visual art, psychology, game studies, material culture, media studies, ecology, and information technology.

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CFP: QUEER TOLKIEN STUDIES

 

Please note that this call is for individual proposals to be sent to the two area chairs who will organize them into complete sessions to be uploaded into the conference database.

 

Please do *not* submit individual proposals through the conference database if you wish to be considered for these themed sessions.

 

Paper Session(s) and Roundtable For PCA/ACA 2018 National Conference (March) 28-31, 2018
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

 

Read more: CFP: QUEER TOLKIEN STUDIES

CfP: Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction

 

The Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction is a peer-reviewed, open-access, online journal hosted by the University of California at Riverside, affiliated with the UCR Library’s Eaton Collection of Science Fiction & Fantasy. Graduate student editors run the Eaton Journal, with scholarly review provided by an interdisciplinary executive board made up of SF scholars, research librarians, and archivists.

Read more: CfP: Eaton Journal of Archival Research in Science Fiction